Monthly Archives: July 2019

Public
Chiltern House Medical Practice – Holmer Green update

Further to the announcement that Primary Care Management Services has been awarded the contract to provide primary care medical services to the patients registered at Chiltern House Medical Centre, they met with the Patient Participation Group last week (Thursday 11th July) to discuss proposals for Holmer Green.

PCMS are clear that they want to ensure they have a presence in Holmer Green as well as supporting residents to access the Temple End surgery in Wycombe. Whilst this will not be in the form of a traditional surgery, they are considering innovative alternatives that would mean Holmer Green is leading the way in finding new ways to meet the needs of patients living in villages.

Although PCMS will continue to provide services to patients, their new contract does not go live until 1 September, and so PCMS are continuing discussions with the PPG in relation to their proposals which are:

  • Introducing a transport champion to support patients to use the Hazlemere & Widmer End Good Neighbours Including Holmer Green Community Transport service and help with bookings.
  • Introducing Q Doctor – an online video doctor service providing secure and easy to use video GP consultations from your PC or smartphone. They are investigating how support sessions may be delivered to assist those less familiar with technology.
  • Having an elderly care nurse and/or paramedic available who can visit patients who are frail or have mobility issues. This service is already in place in PCMS’s Mandeville practice and is receiving very positive feedback.

Finally, PCMS are investigating how they can work with the Pharmacy to provide a consultation base for services like support and advice, blood tests, and vaccinations. This is in the early stages of discussion and is very much dependent on a number of factors, but we will keep you updated on progress.

Public
Taking a medical device on holiday? Don’t let airport scanners ruin your trip

If you’re travelling by air for a holiday or business trip and need to take a medical device with you, there is a new way to prevent them getting damaged at airport scanners. Getting a Medical Device Awareness Card before you fly could help you keep them safe.

Medical devices such as insulin pumps, Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) systems and freestyle libre (flash glucose monitor) devices should not be exposed to x-ray screening and airport scanners, which can cause potential damage.

The awareness card provides information for both the Security Officer and the passenger. Before going through the airport scanners, passengers should make the Security Officer aware of the device (including spare devices) and ask for an alternative security screening method.

Gill Dunn, Diabetes Specialist Nurse, Buckinghamshire Clinical Commissioning Group said “The awareness card is an excellent way to remind patients with an insulin pump or CGM how to prepare for their journey. This includes bringing some medical evidence with them to confirm they use a medical device.”

The awareness card has been produced by the UK Civil Aviation Authority and Airport Operators Association. It can be downloaded and printed direct from the CAA website www.caa.co.uk

More information on the Medical Device Awareness Card is available at www.caa.co.uk

Public
The provision of primary medical services at Chiltern House Medical Centre

NHS Buckinghamshire Clinical Commissioning Group is pleased to confirm that, following a successful procurement process, they have now awarded a contract to Primary Care Medical Solutions (PCMS) for the provision of primary care services to patients at Chiltern House Medical Centre (CHMC). PCMS are currently providing services at CHMC on an interim basis but their new contract will begin on 1 September.

Nicola Lester, Director of Transformation at Bucks CCG said: “Providing the best possible healthcare service to local communities is our priority.

“We have been working with the Patient Participation Group and the wider community to find out what services they would like from their GP practice and patients were involved in the procurement process. We have every confidence that PCMS will be able to provide a service that meets the needs of the local population, both in the High Wycombe and Holmer Green areas.

“Patients do not need to re-register or do anything differently they will be transferred seamlessly to the new provider on 1 September.”

PCMS Managing Director Phil Coates said: “We are delighted to have been awarded the contract for CHMC and have thoroughly enjoyed working with the team and patients over the past twelve months. We want to continue to develop CHMC and that will begin with a number of engagement events to ensure patients are given a say in how services are shaped to meet their needs. We look forward to providing safe, effective high quality care to the patients on a long-term basis.”

For more information about Primary Care Management Solutions, please visit: www.pcmsolutions.co.uk

Public
New Independent Chair appointed to BOB Integrated Care System

David Clayton-Smith has been appointed to the role of Independent Chair of the Buckinghamshire Oxfordshire and Berkshire West Integrated Care System (BOB ICS).

David is currently the Independent Chair of the Epsom and St Helier Improving Healthcare Together 2020-30 Board and the Chair of the Kent, Surrey and Sussex Academic Health Sciences Network (AHSN).

He has extensive experience in Board level roles within the NHS, having formerly been Chair of the East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust (2016 and 2019), Chair of NHS Surrey for three years from 2010 and Chair of NHS Sussex between 2012 and 2013.

David is also a board member and Treasurer of Fairtrade International. He is director and co-founder of Andrum Consulting which specialises in supporting entrepreneurial businesses.

Throughout his career, David has held board-level positions in major blue-chip businesses, latterly as Commercial Director of Halfords and Marketing Director for Boots the Chemist.

The appointment to the role of Independent Chair follows an extensive recruitment process to find someone with the necessary leadership skills and experience to be a key ambassador for the ICS. As Independent Chair, David will work with Fiona Wise, ICS Executive Lead and Chief Executives from across the BOB ICS patch to support and promote partnership working, while making sure there is the appropriate level of independent oversight and assurance of ICS decisions and delivery of strategic priorities.

Speaking about his appointment David said: “I am committed to ensuring that partnership working continues to be a strong theme throughout the work of the ICS. I am looking forward to the opportunity to play my part in helping to achieve the BOB ICS ambition and vision for the communities we serve.”

Public
New ways of working to free up doctors as part of the NHS Long Term Plan

Patients are set to get longer appointments with their family doctor thanks to new ways of working which start today.

Practices large and small will work to support each other and deliver a wider range of specialist care services for patients from a range of skilled health professionals.

Around 7,000 practices across England – more than 99% – have come together to form more than 1,200 Primary Care Networks.

GPs will recruit multi-disciplinary teams, including pharmacists, physiotherapists, paramedics, physician associates and social prescribing support workers, freeing up family doctors to focus on the sickest patients.

The initiative comes alongside efforts to recruit more GPs as part of the NHS Long Term Plan.

The latest figures show an increase of 300 more family doctors on the previous quarter, and the number of young doctors choosing to train as GPs now at a record high after increasing by 750.

There are also thousands more nurses, pharmacists and other healthcare professionals working in general practice than there were just a few years ago.

Another 20,000, who will also include social prescribing link workers, are being recruited to work alongside GPs.

Up to a third of appointments do not need to be with a family doctor, and the new recruits will free up GPs to spend more time with patients who need them most, offering longer appointments to those who need them.

Simon Stevens, Chief Executive of NHS England and Improvement, said: “Strengthening general practice is a central part of the Long Term Plan, and Primary Care Networks have the potential to bring about the biggest improvement for a generation.

“As the PCNs get up and running in the coming weeks and months, patients will begin to see the benefits, freeing up GPs to focus on the sickest.

“This new way of working allows us to keep all that’s best about British general practice, while future-proofing it for the decade ahead.”

The NHS Long Term Plan will see funding for primary medical and community care increase as a share of the NHS budget for the first time in the health service’s 70-year history, with an extra £4.5 billion a year invested by 2023.

Additional funding from the five-year GP Contract agreed with the BMA at the end of January includes £1.8billion to fund the recruitment of 20,000 more specialist health care staff to support general practices.

This builds on the increase of more than 5,000 extra practice staff working with GPs over the past four years.

Patients will also have a range of options when it comes to getting appointments at their practice, including the introduction of digital appointments.

This will build on the progress which saw evening and weekend appointments made available across the country at the end of last year, with an estimated nine million appointments a year now available at more convenient times.

It also means GP practices will be able to drive further action on detecting and preventing killer conditions such as cancer and heart disease, as well as doing more to tackle obesity, diabetes and mental ill health, and support older people at home and in care homes.

Dr Nikki Kanani, a GP and NHS England’s Acting Medical Director for Primary Care and a London GP, added: “People across the country will benefit from access to more convenient and specialist care through their local GP.

“As part of the Long Term Plan for the NHS, GP surgeries large and small will be working together to deliver more specialist services to patients.

“The extra investment, additional staff and more convenient care will be a game-changer for NHS patients and in thousands of communities across England, family doctors are coming together in networks which will not only deliver better care, but a more efficient use of vital NHS resources.”

While many of the networks are getting started today, and it will take some weeks or months for patients to see much change, some PCNs are already up and running and providing new services.

These include the Healthier South Wirral PCN, which is working with Age UK and has appointed a Personal Independence Care worker as part of a frailty pilot aimed at helping people in their own homes.

As a result, the network has reduced the need for GP appointments among those getting proactive support by more than half, and seen a 25% reduction in unplanned hospital admissions.

Dr Tom Wyatt, one of Healthier South Wirral’s Clinical Directors, said: “There is so much work going on out there and we wanted to have one collective approach to help people in our community stay well for longer.”

Dr Richard Vautrey, BMA GP committee chair said: “It is impressive to see how quickly GP practices across England have responded to the contract changes negotiated between ourselves and NHS England just a few months ago, with over 99% now being part of a primary care network.

“With recurrent funding this should support the recruitment of over 20,000 additional people to work directly in practices as part of our healthcare teams.

“It means a pharmacist in every practice, not only reducing GP workload but also improving the quality of care. It will mean connecting patients with physiotherapists directly rather than having to wait for months for a referral, and it means social prescribers helping to meet the needs of those who are lonely and connecting them with others in the community.

“With GPs leading the development of a reinvigorated primary and community healthcare team we are not only starting to tackle the pressures of workload levels but we are also enabling GPs to focus more time on those who need us most.”