Monthly Archives: June 2019

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Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Berkshire West (BOB) Integrated Care System

It has been announced by NHS England/Improvement (NHSE/I) that Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and Berkshire West (BOB) now becomes an Integrated Care System.

It was recognised by NHSE/I that the progress made by Buckinghamshire and Berkshire West as early pioneers of integrated care has shown the difference it can make to the care and health of local communities when NHS providers, commissioners, local authorities and other sector partners work together.

For us in Buckinghamshire, this signals the move to becoming an Integrated Care Partnership (ICP) providing us with the opportunity to focus on delivering local services for local people whilst getting the benefits of working at scale and sharing expertise and resources across the BOB ICS.

Our 12 Primary Care Networks will be the building blocks of more localised health and care in communities, bringing together primary and community services, such as GPs, pharmacists and mental health.

Martin Tett, Leader of Buckinghamshire County Council and Chairman of the Health and Wellbeing Board said: “I am delighted that NHS England has recognised the work we are doing in Buckinghamshire and the difference it is making to our residents. Together with our partners, we can continue to focus on the health and care needs of each community within Buckinghamshire.”

Lou Patten, Chief Executive Officer of Buckinghamshire Clinical Commissioning Group said: “It is important we continue our work in Buckinghamshire though our Integrated Care Partnership. Delivering larger projects across Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and Berkshire West, allows us to focus on local services in our county.”

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Prescribing preparations available to buy over the counter

NHS Buckinghamshire CCG is committed to providing best value by using our resources well. To support the cost effective and evidence based use of medicines, we no longer support the routine prescribing of health supplements and medications that can be bought over the counter.

Why are we doing this?

  • We want to help people live longer, healthier lives and support them to take better care of their health
  • By managing minor health needs through self-care, it will help to ease the pressure on the NHS. Self-care is about avoiding becoming ill and seeking help when needed
  • Buckinghamshire has a set amount of money to pay for the health services that are needed and must spend that money wisely

What treatments and preparations are included?

  • Pharmacy Only (P) and General Sales Lists (GSL) treatments that can be purchased over the counter from a pharmacy with or without advice
  • GSL treatments that can be purchased from other retail outlets such as supermarkets, petrol stations, convenience and discount stores
  • Treatments used to treat a condition that is self-limiting. It does not need treatment as it will heal/resolve by itself
  • Treatments used to treat a condition which lends itself to self-care, i.e. that the person will not normally need to seek medical care and/or treatment

Examples of treatments available OTC which will no longer be routinely prescribed on the NHS in Buckinghamshire: (This list is not exhaustive).

Our list:

  • Acne treatment
  • Analgesic/pain relief treatment (short term pain, fever, headache, muscle/joint injury, infrequent migraine)
  • Anti-fungal treatment (athlete’s foot, oral and vaginal thrush, ring worm, dandruff)
  • Antiperspirant treatment (excessive sweating)
  • Antiseptic creams and treatment for minor burns and scalds
  • Camouflage creams
  • Cold sore treatment
  • Colic treatment
  • Constipation treatment
  • Cough, cold and sore throat treatment
  • Cradle cap treatment
  • Diarrhoea treatment
  • Ear wax remover
  • Emollients and bath oils for mild dry skin
  • Eye treatments/lubricating products (Conjunctivitis/ dry eyes)
  • Fluoride containing products for prevention of dental caries
  • Haemorrhoid (piles) treatment
  • Hayfever treatment
  • Head lice treatment
  • Herbal and complementary treatments
  • Homeopathic preparations
  • Indigestion and heartburn (dyspepsia) treatment
  • Mild cystitis treatment
  • Mouth ulcer treatment and treatment for teething
  • Nappy rash treatment
  • Probiotics
  • Scabies treatment
  • Sunburn treatment
  • Suncream
  • Threadworm treatment
  • Topical steroid treatment (insect bites/stings, contact dermatitis, nappy rash)
  • Travel sickness treatment
  • Vitamins and minerals
  • Wart and verruca treatment

What general exclusions apply?

  • Medicines that can only be obtained with an NHS prescription
  • Where an OTC medicine is outside of its marketing authorisation, also known as “off-label use” or “unlicensed use”. For example when it is not licensed for use during pregnancy or where age or existing medical condition restrictions apply
  • Where an OTC medicine is being prescribed for a long-term (chronic) condition e.g. regular analgesia in osteoarthritis
  • Frail or housebound patients
  • Where there are possible safeguarding concerns including, but not limited to, children, where there might be concerns that treatment might not be provided.

To help you look after yourself

  • Managing short term illnesses and minor conditions,
  • When to seek medical advice
  • What to take if you take other medications.
  • You do not need to make an appointment to see the pharmacist, and many pharmacies are open late and at the weekend
  • If your problem is more serious and needs the attention of another healthcare professional such as their GP, the pharmacist will advise you

Guidance for prescribers

General Medical Council (May 2013) guidance ‘Good practice in prescribing and managing medicines and devices’ states the following:

  • “‘Prescribing’ is used to describe many related activities, including supply of prescription only medicines, prescribing medicines, devices and dressings on the NHS and advising patients on the purchase of over the counter medicines and other remedies”
  • Clinical judgment should be used when considering whether it is acceptable or appropriate to ask patients to purchase their medication
  • The Self Care Forum has produced numerous resources that can be used by healthcare professionals to help support people to self-care

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Take control of your healthcare – join a Patient Participation Group

 

Working hand in hand with their local GP practice, Patient Participation Groups (PPGs) support and advise their local doctor’s surgery on patients’ needs.

GP surgeries across Buckinghamshire rely on the support PPGs offer by giving a voice for all and helping the surgery keep an ear to the ground. Groups are made up of patients from the surgery itself – no other qualifications are needed. The theme of this year’s national campaign to promote PPGs is ‘Celebrating General Practice’.

Dr Raj Bajwa, Clinical Chair of NHS Buckinghamshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) said: “PPGs are an important way that people of Buckinghamshire can work with their GP practices to provide insights about the quality of service they receive and how practices could improve.

“They can support practices to communicate better with their patient population.

“They also have the potential to empower patients to take greater control and responsibility for their own health and that of their family.”

Working in partnership with GPs and practice teams, PPGs ensure the patient perspective is at the heart of local provision so that services are of high quality and continuously improve. Groups also provide practical support in the surgery, foster improved communication between the practice and its patients and help patients to take more responsibility for their health.

Patient Participation Week* runs from 10 – 15 June and aims to highlight the importance of patient participation in achieving excellence in care for everyone.

If you are interested in becoming part of a PPG then please contact your local doctor’s surgery for more information.

*Patient Participation Week is organised by the National Association for Patient Participation, (N.A.P.P) a national charity, formed in 1978. For more information, click here.

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Enter the Healthwatch Bucks Kindness in Care competition

 

There are thousands of people working in our local health and social care services who go that extra mile every day – and Healthwatch Bucks is asking members of the public to help recognise their great work.

Healthwatch Bucks, an organisation dedicated to ensuring health and social care services put the experiences of people at the heart of their work, want to listen to what you have to say about the great care that you receive.

You might have a really wonderful social worker. You might have a nurse who has been kind and compassionate when you needed it most; perhaps a GP has seen you through difficult times; your carer may mean the world to you or a receptionist might have been really helpful. This is your opportunity to say, ‘thank you’.

Simply click here to enter the competition.

By telling Healthwatch about the person who made a big difference to you – what they did and why it meant so much – you could win a £25 Amazon Voucher for yourself and one for them.

Winners will be invited along with their nominee to attend the prize giving ceremony at our annual report launch on the 23 July. If you can’t attend, prizes will be sent to you instead.

Five winning entries will be chosen – those that Healthwatch feel show most clearly that ‘small acts of kindness make a big difference’.

You can enter the competition until 11 June.

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Queen’s Nurse titles for two Buckinghamshire nurses

Two nurses from Buckinghamshire have been awarded the prestigious title of ‘Queen’s Nurse’ for their dedicated work in healthcare.

This award is given to individual nurses who have demonstrated a high level of commitment to patient care and nursing practice.

Christine Croft from Riverside Surgery in High Wycombe and Julia Coates from Unity Health in Princes Risborough have both received the award.

Lou Patten, Chief Officer of NHS Buckinghamshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) said: “On behalf of the CCG and the practices in Buckinghamshire I am delighted for both Christine and Julia. This award is given to nurses who provide exceptional care, and are committed and passionate about nursing.”

“In Buckinghamshire our aim is to provide the highest level of care to our communities and these awards recognise the dedication and hard work that is happening to help us to achieve this.”

Christine Croft, Queen’s Nurse at Riverside Surgery, said: “It is a privilege and honour to receive this title in recognition of the work I have undertaken to improve standards of patient care within the community over the last 19 years. I have worked in the Wycombe Locality and more widely across Bucks. I will also value the opportunity to meet with, and share best practice with, the wider national Queens Nurse Network, seeking to continue to improve standards of care and outcomes for all our patient populations.”

Julia Coates, Queen’s Nurse at Unity Health, said: “I am overjoyed and very proud. It is the most wonderful feeling to look back at your own career and see all that has been achieved.”

For more information about Queen’s Nurses, please visit the Queen’s Nursing Institute website.

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